Concordia LOGOConcordia is a member congregation of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod. We have served the greater Jackson area since 1934. We would love to have you join us for the Divine Service, or sit in on one of our Bible classes!

Current  Schedule on Sundays

Sunday School at 9 am.

Divine Service  at 10:15 am.

And please consider joining us for Wednesdays in the Word at 5:30 pm, followed by Evening Prayer at 7:15pm!


Click Here to see videos of past services. 

We are located at:

637 Wallace Rd 

Jackson, TN 38305

(731) 668-0757


facebook   Visit us at our FACEBOOK PAGE

About Us

Who We Are –


What makes the Lutheran Church distinct from others in the Christian community is our approach towards God’s grace and salvation. We believe that we are saved from sins by God’s grace alone (Sola Gratia) through faith alone (Sola Fide). We also value sacraments as means of grace working towards justification and sanctification.

First and foremost, we believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God, the Savior, and is the fulfillment of God’s love and salvation, as written in the Old Testament of the Bible. Through belief and acceptance of the death and the resurrection of Jesus, we can be reconciled with God and are given the promise of eternal life. The resurrection of Jesus Christ demonstrates that He has supremacy over life and death, and thus has the power to bestow eternal life among us.


Where We Come From –


Lutheranism, the branch of Christianity that traces its interpretation of the Christian religion to the teachings of Martin Luther and the 16th-century movements that issued from his reforms. Luther was a Catholic monk and professor of theology who resided in Germany. The term Lutheran, which appeared as early as 1519, was coined by Luther’s opponents. The self- designation of Luther’s followers was “evangelical”—that is, centered on the Gospel. After the Diet of Speyer in 1529, when German rulers sympathetic to Luther’s cause voiced a protest against the diet’s Catholic majority, which had
overturned a decree of 1526, Luther’s followers came to be known as Protestants. However, because both evangelical and Protestant proved to be overly broad designations (before long they also included the Reformed churches), eventually the name Evangelical Lutheran became standard. Another name occasionally
used is Churches of the Augsburg Confession, which recalls the Lutheran statement of faith presented to the German emperor at the Diet of Augsburg in 1530. In the United States several nomenclatures have been used, all of which, with the exception of the Evangelical Catholic Church, include the term Lutheran in their titles (e.g., the Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod). Today, Lutheranism is one of the largest Protestant denominations in the world, with approximately
eighty million members.
According to Luther, God viewed all humans as sinners. Luther argued that entrance to heaven was not based on a person’s worthiness. Completing good works did not attain someone salvation. Only if a person believed in God’s existence and greatness, would he or she receive God’s grace. One must have faith in God’s love. Unlike Roman Catholics who practiced seven sacraments, Lutherans endorsed only two: baptism and communion. Rather than conducting
services in Latin like the Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church had its ministers give sermons in the language of their congregates. In France, ministers delivered sermons in French and, in England, in English. Latin was a language that usually only the college-educated people understood. Lutherans believed that all people should have access to God’s word. Lutheranism permitted the congregation to
have larger control over religious leaders. The Lutheran Church also permitted church members to play an active role in religious services, including allowing the congregation to profess their love of God through song. In essence, Lutheranism was a much more democratic religious faith than Roman Catholicism. Lutheranism arrived in North America during the 1600s. The majority of the first Lutherans settled in New Amsterdam (modern-day New York City). In the 1700s,
thousands of German Lutherans migrated to Pennsylvania. During the late 1700s and the early 1800s, these people slowly moved westward into what was first the Northwest Territory. Most of these Lutherans were German immigrants. Every community with a sizable German population had a Lutheran congregation. Ministers conducted most Lutheran services in German rather than English. The Lutherans of the time placed a heavy emphasis on education.


Where We’re Headed –


There are seven mission priorities of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod, as reaffirmed at the 2019 LCMS Convention. A resolution from the Convention stated that “our commitment as LCMS congregations and workers is to walk together with the Word of God as our only guide for doctrine and practice.” The emphasis here is that we strive to “Make Disciples for Life.”

Plant, sustain, and revitalize Lutheran churches.

Support and expand theological education.

Perform human care in close proximity to Word and Sacrament ministries.

Collaborate with the Synod’s members and partners to enhance mission effectiveness.

Promote and nurture the spiritual, emotional, and physical well-being of pastors and professional church workers.

Enhance early childhood, elementary and secondary education, and youth ministry.

Strengthen and support the Lutheran family in living out God’s design.

Worship

 

“O Lord, open my lips, and my mouth will declare your praise” (Psalm 51:15).

Divine ServiceThe word “worship” tends to encourage us to think about those things that we do for God: our acts of prayer and praise, our singing, and our offerings. But none of this would be possible apart from the Lord first serving us. Indeed, apart from Christ, we can do nothing. But when Jesus Christ Himself is present through His Word and Sacrament, and therein His Holy Spirit bestows on us His gifts of forgiveness, life and salvation, we can’t help but respond with praise, thanksgiving, and joyful service to our neighbors. The old German word “gottesdienst,” which is translated as “Divine Service,” captures this truth well.

Indeed, when God’s people gather together for worship at Concordia, it is the Divine Service, for it is God Himself who is present to serve us, His people. His servis calls forth ours, and it always runs in this direction. The Lord is the Lord who serves.  And He serves us today through His holy Word and Sacraments. “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28).

Click here to watch archived videos of Concordia’s services.

Come and Visit!

Whether you’re Lutherans traveling through West Tennessee, are unfamiliar with the Lutheran Church, or are just curious, we hope you’ll come and visit. We trust you will be edified through the preaching of Christ crucified for you! Some people are most comfortable in more formal attire (suits, ties, and dresses, for example) while others dress in more relaxed clothing. Either way, the services are always reverent, Christ-centered, and the order of service is printed out so you can follow right along.

 

Children in the Divine Service

“Let the children come to me, and do not hinder them, for to such belongs the kingdom of God” (Luke 18:16).

JesusChildren are important members of our worshiping community—the Body of Christ!  We are committed to incorporating them into the life and mission of Concordia and to nurturing them into an understanding of the gifts they receive from the hand of God in the Divine Service.  We take our responsibility for helping to raise the next generation of God’s people very seriously.

Bringing children to worship will not always be easy, but it is an extremely important part of a child’s spiritual growth.  Even infants learn “the rhythm” of our liturgical worship service, and all children learn from the example of adults what it means to worship God.  We trust that, together, we can provide a positive experience for our young worshipers.

Guiding children in worship is a privilege!  It can be accomplished in love so that the family is able to say: “I was glad when they said unto me, let us go into the house of the Lord” (Psalm 122:1).

 

Concerning the Celebration of Holy Communion (The Sacrament of the Altar)

CommunionThe Lord’s Supper is celebrated at Concordia every Lord’s Day and on special feasts and festivals throughout the year. We believe, teach, and confess that, as He says, our Lord gives into our mouths not only bread and wine but his very body and blood to eat and to drink for the forgiveness of sins and to strengthen our union with him and with one another. Our Lord invites to his table those who trust his words, repent of all sins, and set aside any refusal to forgive and love as he forgives and loves us, that they may show forth his death until he comes.

Because those who eat and drink our Lord’s body and blood unworthily do so to their great harm (1 Corinthians 11:28-30), and because Holy Communion is a confession of the faith which is confessed and proclaimed from Concordia’s altar, any who are not yet instructed, in doubt, or who hold a confession differing from that of this congregation and The Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, and yet desire to receive the sacrament, are asked first to speak with the pastor or an elder.

For further study, see Matthew 5:23ff; 10:32ff; 18:15-35; 26:26-29; 1 Cor. 11:17-34.

 

Concordia LOGOConcordia is a member congregation of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod. We have served the greater Jackson area since 1934. We would love to have you join us for the Divine Service, or sit in on one of our Bible classes!

Current  Schedule on Sundays

Sunday School at 9 am.

Divine Service  at 10:15 am.

And please consider joining us for Wednesdays in the Word at 5:30 pm, followed by Evening Prayer at 7:15pm!


Click Here to see videos of past services. 

We are located at:

637 Wallace Rd 

Jackson, TN 38305

(731) 668-0757


facebook   Visit us at our FACEBOOK PAGE

Music Conservatory

Concordia Conservatory

We are proud to announce that the Conservatory is off and running! Feel free to take a look at the website http://www.concordiaconservatory.net/.

Visual Arts Class

Concordia Conservatory is offering a class on the Visual Arts!

Instructor: Grace Shaw
• Date: Starting on February the 4th
• Time: Thursdays from 3:30pm to 4:30pm
• Grades 4th through 6th
• Price: $ 25.00 per class


This class is designed to teach and encourage students in their visual art skills so that the student will:

• Develop his or her God-given gift in visual arts.
• Create meaningful art projects.
• Be able to recognize the elements of design, composition and color
theory.
• Learn how to use different art materials with appropriate art
techniques.

For more information and to register,

Alex Lobo: 731 693 2261

or the church office: 731 668 0757